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Hey guys, welcome to enjoy First Chattere: Part Three. We hope you have read parts one and two. If you haven’t, you can find part one here and part two here. First Chattere: Parts three, two and one tell stories of how some love relationships in the African setting begin. The usual always when the boy/man approaches the girl/lady to initiate a conversation and make his intentions known. Where and where First Chattere: Part three started “Then came Christmas day and everyone and where was busy. Almost everyone had a rendezvous because it was common on such days. Mine was not an exception because I had promised Mr XYZ during our last meeting we will talk in the days ahead. There was I, on my own, sitting at home after taking my bath. I looked stunning in my black trousers and tight-fitting molang. Visitors had not started coming and neither…

Hello and welcome or welcome back to Eduke’sInk. This is the continuation of “First Chattere-the first boy to ask me for a love relationship”. As promised in chapter one, we are continuing with chapter two today. Take a seat and enjoy First Chattere: Part Two.” In case you missed part one, you can read it here.   Part two of how he went about the chatting thing Sunday came and everyone was at the field to see the ball. The usual football matches were going on and every village was interested watch. XYZ had sent his friend the previous night to tell me he wanted us to talk at the field. This left me nervous the whole night because I didn’t know which response to give him. I knew his motives already. He had been admiring me from afar; most of his attention was focused on me each time…

Though it’s common with almost every African girl in her puberty stage, few can talk about their First “Chattere”-First boy to ask them for a love relationship. Many of our readers have asked to read about our experience of a “chattere.” This story of a first chattere may not apply to all the girls, but, most of them had a similar experience to this. Mind you, most of us African girls could not share these experiences with our mothers because we were shy and had lots of stereotypes. As usual, Eduke’s Ink gives its readers what they demand. Enjoy this beautiful piece. It seeks to inform, educate, and entertain our readers of the stories we have around us. What “Chattere” means “Chattere” in our local Cameroonian parlance is a boy that is asking out a girl on a love relationship. We call it chattere because the boys chat with us…

Find out in this post how the Sweet Long vacations in the villages used to be in Cameroon, particularly my village, Babubock. I know there are similar experiences elsewhere. Feel free to share yours in the comments section. June, July and August used to be some of the most interesting months in my village, Babubock just like the Christmas break. Almost everything sweet and bitter used to happen during these three months. This is because it was time for a long vacation and every student and apprentice from my village came home for the holidays. Babubock is a small village in Nguti Sub Division, South West Region of Cameroon. It is few kilometres from Bangem, chief town of  Kupe Muanenguba Division. Inhabitants from Babubock speak “Akosse”, language of the Bakossi people. You can read more about the Babubock people here. I loved this vacation a lot. It was time to meet family,…

Christmas is sweet in my village When I think of Christmas, the first that comes to mind is new clothes and shoes, rice, chicken, baptism, stew, much meat, balloons, “bonbon”, brown money and homecoming for those who were out of the village. One week to Christmas, pigs, goats, fowls, horses, and cows start mourning. Movements to and from Bangem (where women go for shopping) become rampant while quarrels between man and wife are on a daily basis. All these made Christmas very sweet in my.village How it used to happen in Babubock, my village The preparations always seemed like Jesus was coming in person. It was a time for “Papa and Mama” to award us for excellence.  They always threatened not to buy Christmas dress unless you passed number 1 in the first term exams. And if you did, all the beautiful gifts were yours though even those who failed…

This post is for all parents and guardians who have admirable daughters. I had a bitter experience and I feel every one of you should read and learn. Growing up as a young village girl, I had many admirers. Many men and boys could not stop preaching to my parents how much they loved me. Some still do today. Some admired my beauty, others my innocence, intelligence, others my boldness and many other reasons some of which I do not know. They made jokes and called me “My Wife”. Their parents supported them and it was always something the whole village and city neighbourhood knew. They made countless visits to our home and Papa P (my dad) and Mmayoyo (my mom) welcomed them with food and drinks. Some of my friends even called me “Madam…..” using their names like I was their wife. My reaction? I was very excited because…

We went kernel (banga) hunting during break in primary school. See eerr, this life is very funny. Schooling in the village is one of the experiences that one will never forget. I thought banga cracking was only for village children, but my exchanges with other city friends proved otherwise. It seems the syndrome is everywhere.  Na my stone that di man, no touch am. Na for here I di put my banga, make person no pass for dey. I pick 1, I pick 2. Ayoooo, that your canda for banga don stink my ear. Di banga no di comot for inside, ei di over broke broke”. Those were some of the phrases you will hear from us, the mbanga crackers under palm trees during break. While others were going home to eat ‘Ekule’ (sleeping fufu and black soup), some of us scavenged under the palm tree in a bid to…

From what I can recall, the first person to buy a tv set in my village was Pa Mejame. Back then in the 90s and early 2000s, having a television set in my village, Babubock meant only one thing; you are a rich person. I can’t count how many times my siblings and myself knelt to beg my father to buy us a tv after seeing it in our friend’s house. He kept on saying there was no money. Who brought the first tv to my village? That was after this “Rich Man”, Pa Mejame Gabriel came in with a set of big drums (speakers) and a box that got a mirror at the front (television). There was another amongst the set that made a lot of noise and was always kept behind the house (generator). The noise of this one always called our attention that he was about to…